POSTS FROM ‘Roots: The EHP Blog’

  • Picture a cramped, dusty basement covered wall-to-wall with wooden shelves and metal canisters holding 18th and 19th century documents. Now imagine climate-controlled stacks with metal shelves and documents housed in Hollinger boxes and acid-free folders. How do we as caretakers of history reconcile these two situations? West Virginia University’s Public History program and the Monongalia […]

  • We all know most non-profits run on volunteers.  Working at a small historical society, this is especially true. When I first started my job in Spring of 2015, I was faced with a rather small volunteer force. I wasn’t sure how to go about initiating change and growing the volunteer base, so I made it […]

  • The establishment of new emerging professional groups in museums, history, and related fields, as well as outside of our sphere, has become something of a phenomenon in recent years. The National Council on Public History (NCPH), the International Federation for Public History (IFPH), and AASLH (that’s us) have all founded emerging professional groups in the […]

  • Although museum/history professionals may not face the same problems or have the same priorities as bankers, financial advisers, and other salespeople, networking with professionals from outside the history field can be a valuable tool for museum/history professionals at all levels. Networking allows for those in the history field to help promote their institution in the […]

  • Throughout recent history, individuals and institutions have collected and presented objects that represent major current events. When faced with topics from the Civil Rights Movement, September 11th, Ferguson, and the Women’s March, it is important that items are collected to preserve these times for the future. As a field, especially now, how should our organizations […]

  • It was my first interview. I had eagerly prepared, going over all the projects I had produced from internships. I had a Cultural Landscape Report, an interpretive plan, and how I had discovered that two bodies were mistakenly identified in government records. When the interview began, I was asked: “Do you have experience with heavy […]

  • I find that many Emerging History Professionals (EHPs) these days have blogs of some sort. They traditionally consist of self-promoting posts with little to no content that really contributes to or engages in a conversation. I had explored many of these blogs before I discovered Civil Discourse, a blog started by two classmates of mine […]

  • Earlier this week, I participated in the #AASLHchat on “Issues Facing Emerging Professionals”. Contributors shared so many good ideas, and you can see them all in the Storify. But one question in particular really resonated with me: “How do you identify which skills you need the most?” I think other participants in the chat hit […]

  • This blog was originally posted on Once Upon a Museum. It is reposted here with permission from the author.  Major benefit of having class/discussions/networking events online: you can do so in your bed, in pajamas. This week, as I was simultaneously researching for class and watching the first Syracuse basketball game of the season, I […]

  • Thank you to everyone who joined us in Detroit for our Emerging History Professionals Mentoring Roundtable (and for our Happy Hour aftewards, pictured above). As we reflect on our experiences in Detroit we would like to send a special thanks to the leaders from across the country who made for an engaging discussion. Mentors are […]