Archive for the ‘Best Practices’ Category

  • One of the many pleasures of a recent visit to the American Civil War Museum in Richmond, Virginia, was an encounter with a credit panel listing the scholar-advisors who consulted on the museum’s core exhibition. But the importance of credit panels transcends mere ego satisfaction on the part of those who receive recognition. Credit panels […]

  • We congratulate these members who earned StEPs certificates last month! The Standards and Excellence Program for History Organizations is AASLH’s self-study standards program designed specifically for small to mid-sized history organizations, including volunteer-run institutions. Through a workbook, online resources, and an online community, organizations enrolled in StEPs assess their policies and practices and benchmark themselves against nationally recognized […]

  • Every May 1, public historians and heritage professionals focus on the important work of emergency planning and preparedness. Historic resources and sites are valuable and irreplaceable treasures, so it’s essential to have plans and strategies in place for dealing with events that could threaten their well-being such as flooding, fire, and earthquakes. MayDay participants take […]

  •   Are you looking for accurate and actionable data to better understand what your visitors want and need for a high quality visit and what will bring them back? Now is the time to plan a summer/fall visitor survey project using the Visitors Count! program. Visitors Count! is AASLH’s visitor research program for medium to large history organizations. […]

  • Last month, I attended my first AASLH workshop, “Focusing on Visitors: Public Programming and Exhibits at History Institutions.” My attendance was made possible by receiving AASLH’s diversity workshop scholarship. The two-day workshop was held at historic Locust Grove, in my city of Louisville, Kentucky.  The instructors, Alexandra Rasic of the Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum and […]

  • In the last few years, our field has begun to engage more intentionally with the stories and lives of enslaved people — in many cases, those whose stories went untold at historic houses across the country. New research and institutional courage — as well as a great deal of advocacy — help us to expand […]

  • Our spring intern is wrapping up her time with us at AASLH! Anne Rappaport has been working on continuing education projects in our office for the past few months while completing her graduate program and sharing her valuable perspective as a folklorist. Originally from Long Island, Anne has a B.A. in history and museum studies […]

  • The fifth annual Slave Dwelling Project conference will be held at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, October 24-27. The Slave Dwelling Project’s mission is to identify and assist property owners, government agencies, and organizations with preserving and interpreting extant slave dwellings. Organizers seek proposals for sessions and panels that address the theme of […]

  • Exciting changes are happening at the nearly 1,000 organizations taking part in the StEPs program (Standards and Excellence Program for History Organizations). Our “StEPs Spotlight” blog series highlights accomplishments by participating organizations. Below is another example of how StEPs is helping organizations take a leap forward by improving policies and practices, opening lines of communication, and […]

  • Through the AASLH Diversity Workshop Fellowship, I was fortunate to attend the two-day Exhibit Makeovers workshop in Charlotte, North Carolina, at the Charlotte Museum of History in early March.  I chose to attend this workshop because I have worked more as an interpreter and educator, and now that my job focuses more on collections management […]