Archive for the ‘Education and Interpretation’ Category

  • Interest in and support for labor unions is on the rise in the United States, especially among millennials. Younger Americans tend to view unions as one of the few organizations to offer stability, solidarity, and a voice for workers in an increasingly precarious economic environment. At the same time that support for labor is growing, the very survival […]

  • Meandering. Wandering aimlessly. Lost. Confused. Does this describe your worst road trip? Maybe it describes the conversations between the public and your front-line interpreters? As an undergrad, my freshman English professor told a classmate that reading his paper “was like trying to follow a drunk down the road… it could not be done.” The comment […]

  • A few months ago, we invited local institutions in AASLH’s network to contribute content to the US National Archives’ centennial project, Remembering WWI. Through participation in this national effort, museums, archives, libraries, historical organizations, and others can help contextualize the experience of World War I at the local level, and help grow our national collection […]

  •   When World War II started, I lived in San Diego. And they were advertising for women to replace the men that, of course, had to go to war. And so it was a big challenge to us women, and we were excited to see if we could do the men’s work. Which we did—sometimes […]

  • This blog was originally published by the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University on October 25, 2017. How far removed from the past do we as historians have to be in order to consider a topic viable as history? I ask mostly in terms of the recent past. While some of my […]

  • Call for Proposals for a new edited volume Monument Culture: International Perspectives on the Future of Monuments in a Changing World In 2017, a year of difficult and often appalling events both on the national and international stage, monument culture unexpectedly became the centerpiece of discussion, protest, activism, and vandalism. Scholars and preservationists witnessed monument culture […]

  • Sometimes a bit of thread and yarn can offer a temporary fix when it comes to mending together a solution. The problem for which a solution is needed? Historical erasure. Enter “craftivism,”a contemporary word for a practice that has been around for probably as long as humans have been making things. Writer Betsy Greer is credited […]

  • The Kettle Creek Revolutionary War Battlefield, located between modern Tyrone and Washington, Georgia, has a history of notoriety but also of long periods of obscurity. The latest chapter in its preservation is how twenty-first century methods are expanding its interpretation beyond the battle to reach new audiences and preserve the space for the future. The […]

  • This new series is aimed at paid and unpaid public history professionals as well as history lovers, particularly those who wish they could visit certain museums and sites but either cannot or are remote. In addition to those individual buyers, two major markets for these books are public and high school libraries (since all books […]

  • As we prepare for the 2017 Annual Meeting in Austin, the Educators and Interpreters Affinity Group Committee is trying an experiment. We’re giving presenters who are chairing sessions with education and interpretation themes a chance to give readers a little more information about them – a teaser, if you will. We’ll share two to three sessions each week. We […]