Archive for the ‘Education and Interpretation’ Category

  • Want to explore the intersection between the natural sciences and history at your organization? Here are three takeaways from AASLH Leadership in History Awards award-winning projects on how to tell captivating stories of environmental history: 1. Leverage Local Interests Environmental history can cover extraordinarily long spans of times. One side effect is that sometimes it feel […]

  • As a former classroom teacher and a current front-line interpreter with the National Park Service, I’ve had the privilege of interacting with and educating literally tens of thousands of k-12 students. I didn’t anticipate this turn of events when I first dreamed of being an educator. Early in my training I decided that I wanted […]

  • Over the weekend, I was having a conversation with my husband, who works for a regional financial institution. He told me that his company recently hired a Chief Storyteller. Their job is to travel throughout their region to gather stories from fellow employees and clients about how they used the bank to achieve financial confidence. […]

  • The Welk Homestead State Historic Site, a farm located near Strasburg in south central North Dakota, features a historic house, built in 1899 of sun-dried mud brick known locally as batsa. This is not a house of the wealthy, with beautiful decorative arts, but rather the comfortably and simply furnished house of an immigrant family— […]

  • Memento Mori is a style of art that was popular from the 15th century through the 17th century, which gets its name from the Latin phrase meaning “remember you must die.” The style is marked by images of skulls and corpses and is intended to encourage the viewer to contemplate their own mortality. In a […]

  • The idea for Real World History came to me on a bus, and like so many good ideas, I borrowed it from someone else. Retired northern Virginia history teacher Jim Percoco, wrote a wonderful book called A Passion for the Past, which I started reading on the bus ride home from a summer teacher workshop. Page 11 set […]

  • We’re standing in a circle. I make eye contact with someone I’ve never meet before and I “Caw!” like a peacock. They look back and repeat the sound to me. Then, they pivot in the circle and lock eyes with another person, growling like a bear.  The person growls back and the game continues… Welcome to […]

  • Six sessions recorded as part of our Online Conference for the 2016 AASLH/MMA Annual Meeting in Detroit are now available for purchase ($15 AASLH Members/ $30 Nonmembers). Visit our Online Store to find these and other recorded webinars. Small Museums, Big Impact! Change Agents Being small doesn’t mean thinking small. Examine the successful reinvention of three small […]

  • A plantation site featuring original slave quarters debuts a new interpretation to connect 1850 to the present day community. Historic Stagville was once part of a plantation complex that held over 900 enslaved people, the largest enslaved population in North Carolina. Today, the focal point of the site is four original two-story slave dwellings. Constructed […]

  • The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced that it will award $16.3 million in grants for 290 humanities projects and programs this summer. “The humanities help us study our past, understand our present, and prepare for our future,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams. “The National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to support […]