Archive for the ‘Historic Houses’ Category

  • Blue Star Museums is a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 2,000 museums across America to offer free admission to the nation’s active-duty military personnel and their families, including National Guard and Reserve, from Memorial Day, May 28, 2018 through Labor Day, September […]

  • Full disclosure: I’m no sports fan. Not even close. But last year I discovered something that made sports not only tolerable but enjoyable to watch when I discovered vintage baseball. To those who haven’t heard of it, vintage baseball is living history/reenactment for a sport. In our state, vintage base ball (two words as in […]

  • Every May 1, public historians and heritage professionals focus on the important work of emergency planning and preparedness. Historic resources and sites are valuable and irreplaceable treasures, so it’s essential to have plans and strategies in place for dealing with events that could threaten their well-being such as flooding, fire, and earthquakes. MayDay participants take […]

  • Last month, I attended my first AASLH workshop, “Focusing on Visitors: Public Programming and Exhibits at History Institutions.” My attendance was made possible by receiving AASLH’s diversity workshop scholarship. The two-day workshop was held at historic Locust Grove, in my city of Louisville, Kentucky.  The instructors, Alexandra Rasic of the Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum and […]

  • In the last few years, our field has begun to engage more intentionally with the stories and lives of enslaved people — in many cases, those whose stories went untold at historic houses across the country. New research and institutional courage — as well as a great deal of advocacy — help us to expand […]

  • The fifth annual Slave Dwelling Project conference will be held at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, October 24-27. The Slave Dwelling Project’s mission is to identify and assist property owners, government agencies, and organizations with preserving and interpreting extant slave dwellings. Organizers seek proposals for sessions and panels that address the theme of […]

  • The AASLH Online Conference is a yearly component of our Annual Meeting where six of our most popular sessions are reworked for a virtual audience and broadcast from the conference to registered viewers across the nation. OLC sessions are exclusively available to registrants for six months after the conference and then become available for purchase […]

  • National Poetry Month, inaugurated by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, has become a worldwide celebration of the beauty and cultural value of poetry. While many celebrate by heading to poetry readings, festivals, and bookstores, there are also many museums and historic sites where you can celebrate your love for the written word and […]

  • What do Locust Grove in Louisville, Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, and the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Cincinnati have in common? One, they all had connections to cholera. But more importantly, they all possess a strong desire to take a fascinating historical tidbit and demonstrate its relevancy today. Relevancy persisted as one of the […]

  • We congratulate these members who earned StEPs certificates in the last month! The Standards and Excellence Program for History Organizations is AASLH’s self-study standards program designed specifically for small to mid-sized history organizations, including volunteer-run institutions. Through a workbook, online resources, and an online community, organizations enrolled in StEPs assess their policies and practices and benchmark themselves against […]